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For other uses, see Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (disambiguation)
"To release the power of the sea, all must divide..."
―Tagline

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales is a 272-page novel based on the 2017 film Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales.

DescriptionEdit

Henry is on a mission. As a young sailor in the British navy, he has dedicated his life to the sea, learning all about its lore and legends. He hopes to one day find the Trident of Poseidon, a powerful artifact said to give its bearer the power to control all oceans. It is only with the Trident that Henry can free his father, Will Turner, from a terrible curse.

Carina, a brilliant astronomer, has uncovered a secret: the Map No Man Can Read, the map that leads straight to the Trident of Poseidon, is hidden in the stars. With her knowledge of the heavens, Carina seeks the Trident not only to prove herself as a scientist, but also to unravel a great mystery about where she came from and who she truly is meant to be.

Captain Jack Sparrow could really use the Trident of Poseidon. An old enemy―the ghostly Captain Salazar―has been unleashed on the seas, dead set on killing every pirate he crosses and seeking revenge against Jack. Only the Trident of Poseidon can save Jack from the ruthless pirate killer's attack.

When this unlikely trio teams up, it is a race against time to find the Trident or face certain death. But their quest may be doomed from the start...

Differences between the book and the filmEdit

  • Elizabeth Swann appears at the beginning before Henry goes to the sea in order to meet his father at the Flying Dutchman. She asks him if he is awake, and as he doesn't answer, she simply leaves his room thinking that he is asleep.
  • The novel heavily implies that Bootstrap Bill Turner doesn't form part of the crew of the Flying Dutchman anymore, leaving his fate unclear. In the film, he is never mentioned nor referenced.
  • The main story is set seven years after the opening scene, not nine years like in the film and its comic book adaptation.
  • It's mentioned that Henry's obsession with Jack Sparrow was a running joke among the Monarch's landsmen. It's also implied that Henry's distraction was a punishment not only for him, but for all the landsmen in general.
  • First Officer Wade doesn't appear in the novel.
  • During the chase across the sea the Ruddy Rose strikes her colors in an attempt to surrender. When the crew of the Monarch continues firing at the pirate ship, the Rose sails into the Devil's Triangle.
  • Captain Toms' conversation with Henry and Cole is depicted longer than in the film.
  • Armando Salazar kills Captain Toms by stabbing him with his sword, not by breaking his neck and later throwing his corpse into the fire like in the film.
  • The old pirate gets killed by Salazar, not by one of his soldiers.
  • Some of the backstory of Lieutenant Scarfield, who is named John Scarfield like in The Brightest Star in the North: The Adventures of Carina Smyth, is explored, including his desire to fight in the West Africa wars.
  • The backstory of Mayor Dix is also explored.
  • It's stated that the whole crew of the Dying Gull is aware and recalls the events of their previous adventures with Jack Sparrow, including their adventure against Hector Barbossa's cursed crew, their escape from the Pelegostos Tribe of Isla de Pelegostos, their involvement in Sparrow's rescue from Davy Jones' Locker and the quest for the Fountain of Youth. Before the crew abandons him Jack shows that he is afraid of his sword being cursed.
  • Lieutenant Scarfield condemns Henry to be executed for being a coward as he apparently escaped from the Monarch, not for treason, so Carina Smyth says to Henry that she thinks that he isn't a coward instead of a traitor.
  • Jack Sparrow attempts to rob a coach before returning to Saint Martin Town and entering Grimes Pub. A fisherman arrives shortly after holding a net with Jack's sword stuck in a fish. Jack grabs the sword and throws it into the wall on the opposite side of the tavern where it hits right between the eyes on Jack's own wanted poster.
  • When the Silent Mary sails out of the Devil's Triangle the undead Spaniards immediately notice a pirate ship on the horizon, starting a chase.
  • Shortly before Henry infiltrates the Saint Martin prison a pair of soldiers arrives to inform Lieutenant Scarfield about a new enemy (the Silent Mary) attacking ships in the waters around Saint Martin. When Henry and Jack Sparrow make a deal the pirate recommends the boy to find his old crew and convince them to help him.
  • There were no musicians in Barbossa's cabin when Mullroy and Murtogg informed their captain about Salazar's attack on his fleet.
  • During the Escape from Saint Martin Jack Sparrow knocks down Lieutenant Scarfield with the guillotine's blade, not with a piece of wood like in the film.
  • Right before Jack Sparrow wakes up on the Dying Gull in the middle of the night Henry Turner sees the Silent Mary in the distance for a moment.
  • The novel explains Salazar's past much further than the film, revealing that his father was an Admiral of the Spanish Royal Navy and that his mother died in a workshop following his father's arrest for corruption. Furthermore, in the novel, Salazar's father is instead described as being killed by Salazar himself after his return from prison, rather than pirates as in the film. However, unlike the film, the novel doesn't mention Salazar's grandfather.
  • Jack Sparrow's pirate ship in the flashback scene is never identified as the Wicked Wench. The ship's original captain is also unnamed. The destruction of the Silent Mary is not shown. Captain Teague doesn't appear and the Crew of the Wicked Wench doesn't give Jack Sparrow a tribute.
  • When Carina jumps into the water in order to reach Hangman's Bay via swimming, while Henry saw her ankles, he never comments it, while Jack never answers to him that he could have seen more of Carina's body if he remained silent.
  • When the Crew of the Silent Mary reaches Hangman's Bay several ghosts turn to dust when they step on dry land, not just one like in the film.
  • Barbossa restores the Black Pearl to her normal size during the night, not during the day like in the film.
  • During the journey to Black rock island Jack Sparrow is tied to the main mast, not to the foremast like in the film. During his conversation with Barbossa he mentions that Barbossa was "revoltingly entwined" with Carina's mother "twenty years ago".
  • The novel ends with Jack recovering his position as Captain of the Black Pearl and sailing towards his loved horizon. Elizabeth Swann doesn't appear during Will Turner's return. Davy Jones' appearance at Elizabeth's lighthouse following the story's end is also omitted.

External linksEdit